The Accidental Overture : American Foreign Aid and the Origins of the Hmong-American Alliance 1950 - 1960

dc.contributor.advisorFrost, Dennis J., 1976-
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Frank
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-26T21:24:47Z
dc.date.available2018-10-26T21:24:47Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.descriptionii, 93 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhen CIA agent Bill Lair and Hmong leader Vang Pao met in 1961 and formally agreed to an alliance, the US had been priming the Laotian Hmong community to accept. To explain both the impact of these aid programs and the reason for their implementation, this paper will provide a timeline on both the Lao Civil War and the Hmong. Next, it will escort the reader through the unique diplomatic situation of Cold War Laos by discussing the Geneva Accords, the SEATO alliance, and the ineffectiveness of the Royal Lao Government. The paper will conclude by detailing the scope and impact of American aid programs in Laos. These programs, intersecting with the existing Hmong political culture, formed the basis of the Hmong-American alliance. The author concludes that rather than disappearing into history, the Hmong diaspora in America has preserved their heritage and produced a new generation of cultural, professional, and community leaders.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/36043
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College History Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleThe Accidental Overture : American Foreign Aid and the Origins of the Hmong-American Alliance 1950 - 1960en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
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