U.S. Rate of Cesarean Surgery: Medicalization of Childbirth as a Discursive Formation through the Frameworks of Intersectionality and Reproductive Justice

dc.contributor.advisorButler, Anne Marie
dc.contributor.authorPelak, Helen
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-06T19:47:16Z
dc.date.available2021-06-06T19:47:16Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-17
dc.descriptioniv, 56 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractCesarean surgery (c-surgery) is the most common operating room procedure in the United States. The World Health Organization (WHO) suggests an ideal national c-surgery rate between 10 and 15% (WHO, 2015). In 2018, the United States experienced a c-surgery rate of 31.9%. Of the women who delivered via c-surgery, 21.7% were primary c-surgeries, or the percentage of c-surgeries conducted on pregnant women for the first time (CDC, 2019). Such findings indicate the overuse of c-surgery in the United States. C-surgery is a major abdominal operation that incurs serious risks for both mother and child. Three of the six leading causes of maternal mortality are associated with cesareans: hemorrhage, complications of anesthesia and infection. Furthermore, c-surgery may influence the well-being of subsequent pregnancies. Keag et al. (2018) found that women who had a c-surgery were 17% more likely to have a miscarriage and 27% more likely to experience a stillbirth in subsequent pregnancies. Thus, the overuse of c-surgery motivates analysis from feminist and medical communities as to the factors that contribute to a medically unnecessary c-surgery. The purpose of this paper is to assess the United States rate of c-surgery through the frameworks of Reproductive Justice and Intersectionality. This paper argues that the overuse of c-surgery is influenced in part by Evidence-Based Medicine and defensive medicine. In the evaluation of Evidence-Based Medicine and defensive medicine as factors that contribute to the overuse of c-surgery, the medicalized model of childbirth is understood through Foucault’s notion of a discourse.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://cache.kzoo.edu/handle/10920/39419
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Women, Gender, and Sexuality Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleU.S. Rate of Cesarean Surgery: Medicalization of Childbirth as a Discursive Formation through the Frameworks of Intersectionality and Reproductive Justiceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
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