Modified Replication of the Good Behavior Game and the Effect of the Decline in Treatment Integrity in Two Classrooms

KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.
dc.contributor.advisorHostetter, Autumn B., 1980-
dc.contributor.authorDiekman, Claire A.
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-26T20:30:10Z
dc.date.available2013-10-26T20:30:10Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.descriptionv, 41 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a behavioral intervention that may be used in classroom settings to address and alter problem-behaviors exhibited by students. Examples of these behaviors include: talking without permission, getting out of seat, and being off task. Previous research on the GBG has been successful in reducing the frequency of problem behaviors. Based on Donaldson, Vollmer, Krous, Downs, and Berard (2011), the author assesses the effectiveness of the GBG in two classes when implemented by either a researcher or the teacher and the treatment integrity between the two implementers. She hypothesizes that the overall frequency of total problem-behaviors would decline after playing the GBG despite the percentage decline in treatment integrity between the researcher and the teacher. Results support the hypothesis and provided evidence for the effectiveness of the GBG, regardless of the decline in treatment integrity.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/29029
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Psychology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleModified Replication of the Good Behavior Game and the Effect of the Decline in Treatment Integrity in Two Classroomsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
Files