Two Cultures Collide

dc.contributor.authorMiller, Wendy C.
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-13T15:30:48Z
dc.date.available2008-03-13T15:30:48Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.description.abstract• From 1908 to1924, the first 35,000 Japanese travel to Brazil as temporary short-term migrants coffee plantations in Southern Brazil where they receive low wages and experience cruel working conditions • After World War I, Brazil does not allow the immigration of Europeans, so Brazil welcomes and rewards • In response, Japan encourages emigration to Brazil, and from 1924 to 1934 Brazil welcomes 120,000 Japanese immigrants • 1934 Brazilian government favors European immigrants and creates anti-immigration policy. • By 1945, Japanese migrants learn that Japan has surrendered in the war, so they choose to settle permanently in Brazil… • The 1960s bring economic prosperity to Japan • In the 1980s, Brazil’s declining economic status causes a push for migration • The 1980s bring a demand for laborers in the manufacturing sector, creating • 1990s depict Dekasegi boom (influx of temporary migrant workers) Approximately 230,000 Japanese- Brazilians reside in Japan, making up the second largest immigrant population in Japan after the Chinese. Japanese migrant workers After the Russo-Japanese War, rural areas in Japan struggle to survive amidst a severe depression • The migrants work on farms and coffee plantations in Southern Brazil where they receive low wages and experience cruel working conditions • After World War I, Brazil does not allow the immigration of Europeans, so Brazil welcomes and rewards • In response, Japan encourages emigration to Brazil, and from 1924 to 1934 Brazil welcomes 120,000 Japanese immigrants • 1934 Brazilian government favors European immigrants and creates anti-immigration policy. • By 1945, Japanese migrants learn that Japan has surrendered in the war, so they choose to settle permanently in Brazil… • The 1960s bring economic prosperity to Japan • In the 1980s, Brazil’s declining economic status causes a push for migration • The 1980s bring a demand for laborers in the manufacturing sector, creating • 1990s depict Dekasegi boom (influx of temporary migrant workers) Approximately 230,000 Japanese- Brazilians reside in Japan, making up the second largest immigrant population in Japan after the Chinese. Japanese migrant workers • In response, Japan encourages emigration to Brazil, and from 1924 to 1934 Brazil welcomes 120,000 Japanese immigrants • 1934 Brazilian government favors European immigrants and creates anti-immigration policy.• By 1945, Japanese migrants learn that Japan has surrendered in the war, so they choose to settle permanently in Brazil…en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/4386
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTwo Cultures Collideen
dc.typePresentationen
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