The Positive Effect of Father Involvement on Black Infant Mortality

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Authors
Meldrum, Clayton
Issue Date
2018-03-01
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Thesis
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en_US
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Abstract
At the heart of the infant mortality crisis is Black infant mortality specifically, which is recorded at epidemic levels in communities across the United States. In Kalamazoo, Michigan's thirteenth largest city by population, the risk of Black infant mortality is quadruple that of their white neighbors. Infants of color are by far the most vulnerable group when observing infant mortality in the US, and thus should be the central focus in efforts towards addressing the high average infant mortality rates observed. The racial disparity that is particularly prevalent in infant mortality leads to public health discourse which must encompass more than just clinical measures. Instead, people working in public health use a larger scope in approaching this issue, such as the diagram of social determinants of health (SDOH) included in the Healthy People 2020 plan (see Figure l below). This includes addressing social components factoring into the epidemic rates of infant mortality, specifically for babies of color. Four of the five main SDOH presented below, including neighborhood/environment, economic stability, health care, and social/community context, will be discussed throughout this paper.
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v, 62p.
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