Parental Styles and Their Effects on the Mental Well-Being and Competence of Adolescents in Individualist and Collectivist Cultures

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dc.contributor.advisorBatsell, W. Robert, 1963-
dc.contributor.authorOjimba, Franco U.
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-30T12:42:35Z
dc.date.available2013-07-30T12:42:35Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.descriptioniv, 33 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractCulture is universal and varies depending on the culture immersed. As a result, practices and values would differ between cultures. Some of these values and beliefs include child-rearing beliefs, eating, praying social conversational norms, and such. Parental styles or child rearing practices are thus dependent and influenced by culture and by definition, a social construct. Self-esteem is part of adolescent mental well-being and parental styles are one of the predictors of either high or low self-esteem. Self-esteem is important because it controls the emotional state and function of the individual. The current study seeks to examine individualist and collectivist cultures and how their parental styles influence the mental well-being of their adolescents. The findings suggests that parents from Individualist cultures use a variety of parental styles when parenting their children. These styles include Authoritarian, Authoritative, Permissive/Indulgent, and Neglectful parenting and each have separate influences on their adolescents' behavior and mental states. The parental style widely preferred in collectivist cultures usually entails more demand and control, but this parental style unlike the authoritarian parent in the individualist culture is not necessarily lacking in warmth. The parental styles of collectivist cultures however tends to have an effect on the self-esteem and depressive states of their adolescents. This study seeks to add to the growing data on the effects of parental styles on adolescents. The findings suggests that in collectivist cultures like Asian, increased parental demand, and conformity seems to add to the low self-esteem and increased depressive symptoms of their youths.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/28927
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Psychology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Psychology.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleParental Styles and Their Effects on the Mental Well-Being and Competence of Adolescents in Individualist and Collectivist Culturesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
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