Food Security in The United States : Is Food a Basic Human Right?

dc.contributor.advisorGeist, Alison, 1953-
dc.contributor.authorConner, Ellen
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-11T20:27:19Z
dc.date.available2024-02-11T20:27:19Z
dc.date.issued2012-11-01
dc.descriptioniv, 24 p.
dc.description.abstractThis project takes a critical look at the current state of food assistance in the United States in an attempt to understand the nation's reasons for failing to ratify food as a basic human right By drawing upon the research of food security and human rights advocates, economists, and government officials, as well as a qualitative study at Kalamazoo Loaves & Fishes, this paper explores the main arguments for and against ratifying the human right to food. Following these arguments this research further poses conjectures about the outcomes of a policy decision for or against the right to food for food security in the United States. This study shows that the current system is itself in need of assistance and that the ratification of food as a basic human right is part of the answer.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10920/44814
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Health Sciences Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Health Sciences;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleFood Security in The United States : Is Food a Basic Human Right?
dc.typeThesis
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