To My Family : A Final Request : Death, Transnationalism, and Mourning

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dc.contributor.advisorBaptiste, Espelencia M., 1970-
dc.contributor.authorSoriano, Yaneli
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-21T18:10:16Z
dc.date.available2017-01-21T18:10:16Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.descriptionv, 53 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research involves conversations revolving around the topics of death and immigration. Most studies on death and immigration are often studies on the alarming (im)migrants who have settled in the US. This project proposes to expand the conversation about death, body repatriation, identity, and belonging by conducting interviews with (im)migrants living in Los Angeles, CA who are from Oaxaca, MX or other rural communities in Mexico. While each case is different, a goal with the gathered data is to expand the conversation of family and belonging. This project expands the research of death and immigration by researching the different impacts of neoliberalism on death and the different push and pull factors that may influence a person's decision on the location of their final resting site. Finally, shines light on the offspring perspective, their final resting site decision, and how their parents' decision impacts them.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/30617
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo, Mich. : Kalamazoo College.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Anthropology and Sociology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleTo My Family : A Final Request : Death, Transnationalism, and Mourningen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
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