Samuel Beckett: His Quest for Direct Self-Expression

dc.contributor.advisorCollins, David A., 1931-2011
dc.contributor.advisorHarris, Harold J., 1924-2013
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Bryan
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T14:19:58Z
dc.date.available2011-05-24T14:19:58Z
dc.date.issued1981
dc.descriptioniv, 81 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractMy interest in Samuel Beckett was sparked while I was studying at l'Universite de Clermont-Ferrand in the winter of 1981. I was intrigued by the universal qualities of En attendant Godot and I wanted to discover why Beckett wrote in French. I set out to answer this question and then to compare Beckett's English fiction to his French fiction in order to establish the personality of each. The French translation still follows this line. However, in translating my criticism, I realized the trend in Beckett's work as a whole. The criticism then became an attempt to explain Beckett's ahistorical, apolitical, asocial literature. It became a study of Beckett's selfish quest.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/21997
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College English Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. English.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.subject.lcshBeckett, Samuel, 1906-1989
dc.titleSamuel Beckett: His Quest for Direct Self-Expressionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
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