Being Black in a White Education System

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dc.contributor.advisorWilson-Oyelaran, Eileen B., 1947-
dc.contributor.authorJarrett, Klissa
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-16T19:56:50Z
dc.date.available2013-11-16T19:56:50Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.description43 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractWalking down the hallways at Hillside Middle school, I hear the taunts the students give each other every day. I see the remnants of a culture never identified or taught in our public school system. In this study, I analyze the different stages of identity, specifically as it relates to black youth and their development in the public schools. No Child Left Behind was supposed to help address the reasons why there was/still continues to be an achievement gap between black students and white students, but it failed to recognize a key factor to the problem. How a child views himself plays a big role in how successful they will be.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/29051
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Human Development and Social Relations Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleBeing Black in a White Education Systemen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
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