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dc.contributor.authorArnosky, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-04T19:19:00Z
dc.date.available2009-05-04T19:19:00Z
dc.date.issued2009-05-04T19:19:00Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/8290
dc.description1 broadsideen
dc.description.abstractThe role of native bees as pollinators is essential to ecosystem stability and economic prosperity. Without bees, two-thirds of all angiosperms and over one-third of the world food supply would disappear. Recently, scientists suspect plausible declines in native bee populations due to disappearing bumble bee and honey bee colonies; however, most native bee populations are unmanaged and therefore have not been monitored. The purpose of this study was to develop a baseline survey of native bee diversity at Pierce Cedar Creek Institute (PCCI) and to gain insight on effects of different habitat types, temporal changes, and human disturbance on native bee diversityen
dc.description.sponsorshipKalamazoo College. Department of Biology. Diebold Symposium, 2009.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherKalamazoo, Mich. : Kalamazoo College.
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Diebold Symposium Presentations Collectionen
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.en
dc.titleNative bee diversity of Pierce Cedar Creek Institute in Southwest Michiganen
dc.typePresentationen


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  • Diebold Symposium Posters and Schedules [320]
    Poster and oral presentations by senior biology majors that include the results of their Senior Individualized Projects (SIPs) at the Diebold Symposium. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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