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dc.contributor.authorLocsei, Morgan
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-20T14:58:01Z
dc.date.available2009-04-20T14:58:01Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/8120
dc.description1 broadside
dc.description.abstractThe areas of stereotype threat and educational tracking are both widely researched, however the connections between these two topics have never been explored. Women are negatively stereotyped in the domain of mathematics relative to men, and this proposed study analyzed whether tracking in mathematics decreases or increases math-related stereotype threat for female students. Psychological and educational literature on stereotype threat and tracking were analyzed. A comparative study was then proposed to examine eleventh grade students in three different math classes from a private all-female school and a public mixed-gender school. Results analyzed students’ grades, GPA, and questionnaires designed to measure academic ability and concepts related to stereotype threat that were completed four times throughout the school year. It was expected that low-track females would have higher stereotype threat scores than high-track females, for females to have higher stereotype threat scores than male students, and for stereotype threat to be higher in the mixed-gender school than the all-female school.en
dc.description.sponsorshipKalamazoo College. Department of Psychology. VanLiere Symposium, 2009
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherKalamazoo, Mich. : Kalamazoo College.en
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Psychology VanLiere Symposium Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleStereotype Threat and Tracking in High School Math Classesen
dc.typePresentationen


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  • VanLiere Symposium Posters [218]
    This collection contains posters by Psychology Department majors who present their Senior Individualized Projects to the members of the campus. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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