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dc.contributor.advisorLatiolais, Christopher, 1957-
dc.contributor.authorWarner, Adam W.
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-17T19:54:58Z
dc.date.available2009-04-17T19:54:58Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/8119
dc.description145 leavesen
dc.description.abstractThe critical corpus of Michel Foucault is about a lot of things. It is about madness, sexuality, modern medicine, science, prisons, history, systems of thought, language, ethics, modernity, the ancients, power, knowledge, power/knowledge, and so on. Since his death in 1984, Foucault's writings on these topics have never ceased to fascinate other thinkers. While Foucault is commonly thought of as a philosopher, his texts have settled comfortably in humanities and social science departments throughout the United States. In fact, Foucault's vision of the 'anti-science' (genealogy),that method which seeks to unearth the 'disqualified' and 'subjugated' knowledges suppressed in the local histories of our culture, has inspired the emergence of a host of sub-disciplines from queer theory to the post-colonialism of Edward Said to the New Historicism of literary critic Stephen Greenblatt. Additionally, it has made a significant impact in other disciplines such as anthropology and sociology (symbolic violence), feminism (the body), the history of ideas (the archaeological method), and political theory (power). In a telling remark, queer theorist William Turner captures the significance of Foucault's thought when he declares: "The conditions of possibility for queer theory probably arose somewhere between the publication of two of Foucault's major works: The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences in 1966 and Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison in 1975. This statement is of particular interest since it suggests that Foucault's writing enabled practitioners of these disciplines to investigate, interrogate, and lay bare an entire
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Philosophy Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Philosophy.en
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleHow to Read Foucaulten
dc.typeThesisen


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    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Philosophy Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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