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dc.contributor.advisorLepisto, Douglas A.
dc.contributor.advisorArellano, Ivan F.
dc.contributor.authorTomac, Rachelle A.
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-13T16:46:13Z
dc.date.available2008-03-13T16:46:13Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/4408
dc.description1 broadside
dc.description.abstractThe experiment studied how changing the ethnic identity (i.e., Arab terrorists or Columbian guerillas) of ‘bad-guys’ in a first-person shooter game would affect participants’ attitudes toward the game. Participants in the ‘Arab’ group found the game to be significantly more fun and more anxiety provoking than the ‘Columbian’ group. Television viewing habits had a significant influence on the results. Overall, participants who watched greater amounts of television experienced more anxiety, tension, fun, and satisfaction. Participants in the ‘Arab’ group who watched higher amounts of television experienced more anxiety and tension as the result of the interaction of media influences and ethnicity.en
dc.description.sponsorshipKalamazoo College. Department of Psychology. VanLiere Symposium, 2004
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherKalamazoo, Mich. : Kalamazoo College.en
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Psychology VanLiere Symposium Collectionen
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.en
dc.titleInfluences of Media and Ethnicity on Violent Video Gamesen
dc.typePresentationen


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  • VanLiere Symposium Posters [192]
    This collection contains posters by Psychology Department majors who present their Senior Individualized Projects to the members of the campus. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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