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dc.contributor.authorMiller, Wendy C.
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-13T15:30:48Z
dc.date.available2008-03-13T15:30:48Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/4386
dc.description.abstract• From 1908 to1924, the first 35,000 Japanese travel to Brazil as temporary short-term migrants coffee plantations in Southern Brazil where they receive low wages and experience cruel working conditions • After World War I, Brazil does not allow the immigration of Europeans, so Brazil welcomes and rewards • In response, Japan encourages emigration to Brazil, and from 1924 to 1934 Brazil welcomes 120,000 Japanese immigrants • 1934 Brazilian government favors European immigrants and creates anti-immigration policy. • By 1945, Japanese migrants learn that Japan has surrendered in the war, so they choose to settle permanently in Brazil… • The 1960s bring economic prosperity to Japan • In the 1980s, Brazil’s declining economic status causes a push for migration • The 1980s bring a demand for laborers in the manufacturing sector, creating • 1990s depict Dekasegi boom (influx of temporary migrant workers) Approximately 230,000 Japanese- Brazilians reside in Japan, making up the second largest immigrant population in Japan after the Chinese. Japanese migrant workers After the Russo-Japanese War, rural areas in Japan struggle to survive amidst a severe depression • The migrants work on farms and coffee plantations in Southern Brazil where they receive low wages and experience cruel working conditions • After World War I, Brazil does not allow the immigration of Europeans, so Brazil welcomes and rewards • In response, Japan encourages emigration to Brazil, and from 1924 to 1934 Brazil welcomes 120,000 Japanese immigrants • 1934 Brazilian government favors European immigrants and creates anti-immigration policy. • By 1945, Japanese migrants learn that Japan has surrendered in the war, so they choose to settle permanently in Brazil… • The 1960s bring economic prosperity to Japan • In the 1980s, Brazil’s declining economic status causes a push for migration • The 1980s bring a demand for laborers in the manufacturing sector, creating • 1990s depict Dekasegi boom (influx of temporary migrant workers) Approximately 230,000 Japanese- Brazilians reside in Japan, making up the second largest immigrant population in Japan after the Chinese. Japanese migrant workers • In response, Japan encourages emigration to Brazil, and from 1924 to 1934 Brazil welcomes 120,000 Japanese immigrants • 1934 Brazilian government favors European immigrants and creates anti-immigration policy.• By 1945, Japanese migrants learn that Japan has surrendered in the war, so they choose to settle permanently in Brazil…en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTwo Cultures Collideen
dc.typePresentationen


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  • Hightower Symposium Posters [196]
    Sociology/Anthropology and Human Development & Social Relations (HDSR) students formally present their SIPs at the Hightower Symposium in senior spring. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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