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dc.contributor.authorGuillén, Mauricio
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-02T14:57:15Z
dc.date.available2022-05-02T14:57:15Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttps://cache.kzoo.edu/handle/10920/43592
dc.description1 broadside. 48"W x 36"Hen_US
dc.description.abstractManeadero is a coastal municipality part of Ensenada Baja California Mexico which has been an agricultural hotspot for the past few decades. I conducted an autoethnographic qualitative research project where I interviewed local farmers in Maneadero who are family members, to note how their experiences have changed throughout time with ongoing change in temperatures and exacerbating deficit of rainfall. As I went about conducting the interviews with my uncles, I realized that many local farmers in Maneadero are protecting their crops from drastically changing climate and reducing the amount of water used to irrigate to the best of their abilities, yet are struggling to maintain high levels of production they used to yield. I noticed that when I conceived of this research, I completely overlooked a very important aspect regarding agricultural production in Maneadero from the very beginning; the lack of access to unpolluted water. By speaking with the participants, residual treated wastewater becomes the solution to mitigate sea water intrusions and helps recharge the aquifers providing cleaner and abundant water. My thesis argues that there is a need for a paradigmatic shift in how we see water availability and accessibility.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKalamazoo College. Department of Anthropology and Sociology and Human Development and Social Relations (HDSR). Hightower Symposium, 2022en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo, Mich. : Kalamazoo Collegeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Hightower Symposium Presentations Collectionen
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.en
dc.titleNo hay agua: Water Scarcity Affecting Farmers in Ensenada BC, Mexico Catalyzing the Requirement for Adaptation Methods to be Implementeden_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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  • Hightower Symposium Posters [196]
    Sociology/Anthropology and Human Development & Social Relations (HDSR) students formally present their SIPs at the Hightower Symposium in senior spring. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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