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dc.contributor.advisorLindley, Sarah, 1973-
dc.contributor.authorAlamo, Hayleigh
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-08T12:30:20Z
dc.date.available2019-07-08T12:30:20Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/37188
dc.description23 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractOrnamental plants have been continuously brought over to the United States from Eastern Asian countries for many decades on the sole purpose of aesthetic enhancement of landscapes and domestic spaces. People do not realize the negative impact that they have on the environment by introducing a non-native species into an ecosystem. Some of the harmful aspects of invasive plant species involves the takeover of a native area which encompasses the change of an ecosystem and the organisms that reside there. It can be detrimental to an ecosystem by making native plants or organisms extinct. The type of clay that was used, porcelain, was an important choice in the making of my project. Three of the top ornamental invasive plant species were used in the construction of these works of art. The use of pottery combined with hand building was united in order to make invasive species on pottery forms. A total of seven pieces were constructed for the final review. Of these, four were left unglazed to explore the delicacy of porcelain and naturalistic qualities of the invasive species, Oriental Bittersweet, Japanese Barberry, and Kudzu. Three pieces were glazed to exhibit the different qualities that glaze can have on a work, which involved using examples from Kudzu and Oriental Bittersweet. My intention is to make people think more about where plants have come from. These plants are botanical and exotic species that become dangerous commodities which draws a parallel between pottery aesthetics and decorative landscaping.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Art Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.title(Porcelain SIP)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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  • Art and Art History Senior Individualized Projects [374]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Art and Art History Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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