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dc.contributor.advisorApps, Hannah J., 1955-
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Nick
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-23T21:30:49Z
dc.date.available2019-02-23T21:30:49Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/36687
dc.descriptionvi, 52 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractPharmaceutical prices today are higher than they have ever been, and have been increasing greatly in the last 30 years. This research covers the recent trends in price increases and the causes behind them, along with the effects of price increases on society. The purpose of the research is to discover what factors most significantly drive these price increases. Additionally, this research studies the relationship between pharmaceutical innovation and price controls. A broad examination of the pharmaceutical industry and an analysis of two drugs, Epi-pen and Insulin, will help to illustrate the rise in pharmaceutical prices, and will show how prices have increased without innovation in either of these drugs. The research will show that the lack of price controls in the United States allows firms to charge higher prices to consumers. The research will also show, however, that innovation for new drugs is greater in America than countries that have limits on prices. In conducting the research to determine this, a mix of both quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis was used to answer these questions.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Economics and Business Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titlePharmaceutical Prices in the United States, Canada, and Europe : Why Differences Exist and Economic Consequencesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Economics and Business Senior Individualized Projects [1120]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Economics and Business Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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