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dc.contributor.advisorHussen, Ahmed
dc.contributor.authorLaverenz, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-16T16:15:23Z
dc.date.available2017-09-16T16:15:23Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/31117
dc.descriptionvi, 69 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere is currently a stigma related to the construction of green, sustainable buildings. In the past, sustainable technology was far too expensive to yield a return on investment. This discouraged architects from incorporating sustainable infrastructure, as it was not a financially feasible. In recent years however, the technology necessary to construct a sustainable building has become viable enough to yield a return on investment. Unfortunately, most buildings are still being designed with no concern to their environmental impact due to the lack of awareness and perceived risk of green building. In order to fully assess the value that green buildings have to offer, a life cycle analysis of the Arcus Center has been conducted. This sustainable building on Kalamazoo College's campus has provided two years’ worth of utility consumption data allowing the comparison of the social, environmental, and financial benefits of sustainable "green" design to the costs of the high performance technology, construction and assessment costs, and operation and maintenance costs. The main goal of this case study is to provide an analytical examination of a sustainable building's lifetime value compared to its past and future costs.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Economics and Business Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleThe Economic and Environmental Impact of Sustainable Building : A Life Cycle Analysis Using the Arcus Center as a Case Studyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Economics and Business Senior Individualized Projects [1093]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Economics and Business Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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