Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorO'Donnell, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Evan
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-09T14:05:34Z
dc.date.available2017-09-09T14:05:34Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/31094
dc.description43p.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs climate change volatilizes environment conditions, it is more important than ever to understand how (and if) organisms adapt to altered thermal environments. A basic scientific understanding of thermal adaptation in marine diatoms is particularly imperative, given their substantial ecosystem services and rich applied value. Here, we explore thermal adaptation in marine diatoms with in vitro experimental evolution of Thalassiosira Pseudonana in two different thermal environments: 16 °C and 31 °C. After over two years of putative evolution, we tested for adaptation by first characterizing the growth of each algal population at both 16 °C and 31 °C, and then running computer simulations of resource competition between 16 °C-selected populations arid 31 °C selected populations. Surprisingly, in our simulations, the 31 °C-selected algae outcompeted the 16 °C when competing at 16 °C. Similarly, the 16 °C-selected algae outcompeted the 31 °C when competing at 31 °C. This pattern of "anti-adaptation" is difficult to explain. Further research is certainly needed to elucidate our results.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo Collegeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Biology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleSome Like it Hot But the Hot Like it Cold: Adaptation to Thermal Regimes in the Marine Diatom Thalassiosira Pseudonanaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Biology Senior Individualized Projects [1520]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Biology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

Show simple item record