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dc.contributor.authorHoward, Jackie
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-01T19:35:01Z
dc.date.available2017-02-01T19:35:01Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/30624
dc.description1 Broadside. Original created in Microsoft PowerPoint. 48"W x 36"Hen_US
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between F. obscuripes and the membracid nymph is crucial to the survival of the nymphs because the nymphs (being much smaller and less mobile than adults) are more susceptible to predation. The presence of ants has a positive effect on the abundance and survivorship of membracid nymphs. Ant-tending for two Homoptera species has been found to shorten the time spent during development and therefore possibly increase growth rate of the membracid nymph. The presence of F. obscuripes increases the size of the P. modesta membracid nymphs significantly more than when the ants are absent. However, from these findings, it is unclear as to whether the nymphs with ants present are bigger because they are at a later instar, or because they are bigger for a given instar. An increased size in most insects has been found to increase fitness, fecundity, success in overwintering, and decrease predation dangers.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKalamazoo College. Department of Biology. Diebold Symposium, 2008en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo, Mich. : Kalamazoo Collegeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Diebold Symposium Presentation Collectionen
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.en
dc.titleThe Effect of Ants on Membracid Nymph Growth Patterns: Size and Developmental Rateen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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  • Diebold Symposium Posters and Schedules [320]
    Poster and oral presentations by senior biology majors that include the results of their Senior Individualized Projects (SIPs) at the Diebold Symposium. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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