Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDeLong, Clare
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-18T19:30:02Z
dc.date.available2017-01-18T19:30:02Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/30583
dc.description1 broadside. Original designed using Microsoft PowerPoint. 48"W x 36"Hen_US
dc.description.abstractOn September 23rd, 1954 the decision to force desegregation of America’s public schools, made it unconstitutional to have racially separate schools. However, literature today suggests the Brown v. Board of Education court case was detrimental and negatively impacted colored children. It also suggests this contributed to the current discipline and achievement gaps, and impacted today's racial imbalance among careers and graduation rates. Foucault describes the Panoptic gaze as the foundation to our understanding of discipline. Brown v. Board of Education placed children of color in schools where they were a minority, contributing to the frequency and harshness of discipline. Racial bias shaped the foundation of today’s discipline structure, and how authority figures in schools react to colored students differently than the White students. My senior thesis explored the previously mentioned gaps, factors that influence decisions made by authority, and how the combination of inherent bias and a biased discipline system can impact different authority figures disciplinary decisions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKalamazoo College. Department of Anthropology and Sociology and Human Development and Social Relations (HDSR). Hightower Symposium, 2016.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo, Mich. : Kalamazoo Collegeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Hightower Symposium Presentations Collectionen
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.en
dc.titleBiased Discipline & Predisposition within American Public Schoolsen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Hightower Symposium Posters [196]
    Sociology/Anthropology and Human Development & Social Relations (HDSR) students formally present their SIPs at the Hightower Symposium in senior spring. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

Show simple item record