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dc.contributor.advisorLindley, Sarah, 1973-
dc.contributor.authorLundberg, Joanna N. Y.
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-08T19:31:03Z
dc.date.available2016-10-08T19:31:03Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/30508
dc.description33 p.en_US
dc.description.abstract“As an artist, I am interested in exploring the boundaries between technology and the human body as they are increasingly revealed as tenuous, shifting, and unstable. The technological artifact or tool can no longer be seen as external to the body. The corporeal and the artificial have been integrated with the engineering of prosthetic extensions that move away from or into the body. Advancements in communications technology are changing the way information is taken into and expelled from the body. Increasingly penetrated by technology, we may no longer conceive of the body as a closed system. With this in mind, I chose to focus on hollow, tapering forms. The forms are appealing in that they simultaneously suggest growth and decay, interiority and exteriority, and extension and contraction. The "organic" materials of wax and string which comprise the exteriors of these forms are reminiscent of the body, resembling flesh and hair, and contrast with the found "industrial" components, the steel coil and aluminum conduit tubing, which make up the interiors. The wax and string retain their intrinsic colors, pale shades of yellow and beige, making the objects at once more legible (in their material composition) and less legible (as recognizable consumer goods). Additionally, the works are executed in a deliberately "human" scale, inviting the viewer to consider what the function or identity of these objects is in relation to his or her own body.”en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Art Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleWhite Noiseen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Art and Art History Senior Individualized Projects [363]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Art and Art History Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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