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dc.contributor.advisorLane, Amy, 1974-
dc.contributor.authorCollier, Annaliese
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-09T15:38:42Z
dc.date.available2016-04-09T15:38:42Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/30295
dc.descriptioniii, 59 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, Americans have become obsessed with increasing the number of students who participate in study abroad. Actually increasing the number and diversity of study abroad students has presented a major challenge in educational circles. The persistent dominance of white, female U.S. students in study abroad demographics suggests that the study abroad as an institution, and study abroad research in particular, face systemic issues which prevent study abroad experiences from facilitating their stated goal of intercultural competence. This project is an attempt to illuminate those systemic issues in order to improve the conceptualization of study abroad within the literature. The review of the current literature has resulted in the identification of four faulty assumptions which pervade study abroad research, as well as the importance of structuring critical reflection into study abroad experiences as a way to promote intercultural competence. This work represents an important first step in dismantling research practices which perpetuate white-supremacist, capitalist, patriarchal structures.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo, Mich. : Kalamazoo College.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Anthropology and Sociology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleResearch for Revolution : A Critical Investigation of Study Abroad Literatureen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Anthropology and Sociology Senior Individualized Projects [658]
    This collection includes Senior Integrated Projects (SIP's) completed in the Anthropology and Sociology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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