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dc.contributor.authorRing, Katherine A.
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-11T14:38:29Z
dc.date.available2015-04-11T14:38:29Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/29590
dc.description60 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the use of two theories—the Enneagram and the SCARF® Model—that focus on core instincts and motivations, as a way to facilitate self awareness, social-awareness, and development. The researchers conducted a quantitative research study to measure a relationship between the SCARF® Model and the Enneagram, within the context of existing literature of personality theory, comprised of 322 participants of a convenience sample who completed two online self-assessment questionnaires. Researchers hypothesized there to be a relationship between the three Enneagram Subtypes and five SCARF® domains, which measure non-conscious survival instincts in relation to social interactions. Researchers ran One-way Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and T-tests to evaluate the hypothesis. Though the data showed no statistically significant relationship between SCARF® domains and Subtypes, a statistically significant relationship was observed between the Relatedness SCARF® domain and Enneagram Type 9. Furthermore, the results showed the Certainty SCARF® domain as the most important instinct regardless of Enneagram Type and that each Enneagram Type appears in the top three highest averages of at least one SCARF® domain. Additionally, the researchers found qualitative support that participants felt personal benefit and newfound awareness of themselves by partaking in both self-assessments. Beyond this preliminary study, future research should be conducted with a larger sample size to better determine which relationships exist between the SCARF® Model and the Enneagram. Moreover, more research should be done to determine the personal benefits that participants have gained from learning about theories and using tools such as these.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis item is Katherine Ring's SIP. A poster of the same title is available at: https://cache.kzoo.edu/handle/10920/29699
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Psychology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleThe Enneagram and the SCARF® Model: a Study of Two Complimentary Psychological Modelsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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  • Psychology Senior Individualized Projects [722]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Psychology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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