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dc.contributor.advisorKoenig, Richard
dc.contributor.authorElissetche, Crystal
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-17T23:53:13Z
dc.date.available2014-10-17T23:53:13Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/29448
dc.description27 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractStorytelling is one of the oldest art forms for sharing wisdom and understanding the complexities of the world. Oral traditions such as storytelling are valued customs for passing knowledge from one generation to the next. For many marginalized groups, such as immigrants and Latinos, oration and storytelling remain central to preserving cultural traditions and knowledge within their communities.1 Such is the practice amongst many American migrant families when literacy is limited.2 And as the daughter of migrant farm workers, growing up with the stories of my parents and elders, storytelling has had a profound impact upon my being. It is a tradition I take very seriously. Documentary film both modernizes and captures the spirit of this tradition with its power to connect global audiences through knowledge. It is from these universal arts that the film “Invisible Neighbors” is derived. “Invisible Neighbors” utilizes the blending of audio, video, and music elements to expressively challenge traditional power structures by privileging a different, creative pedagogy. 3 Therefore, “Invisible Neighbors,” through the medium of documentary film, is a new way of conducting critical ethnography where the stories of people, community and culture are told through a different voice—that of the traditionally objectified and marginalized local, American farmer and migrant farm worker.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Art Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleInvisible Neighbors : Migrant Farm Workers Speaken_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Art and Art History Senior Individualized Projects [374]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Art and Art History Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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