Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorGirdler, Erin Binney, 1969-
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Megan
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-25T19:37:57Z
dc.date.available2014-01-25T19:37:57Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/29126
dc.descriptionvi, 44 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractCentaurea stoebe is a major invasive species within the United States that has invaded the sensitive dune habitats of the Great Lakes region. This area is home to many unique and increasingly rare species, two of which are Cirsium pitcheri and Tanacetum huronense. We sought to determine whether Centaurea is negatively impacting Cirsium and Tanacetum on the shoreline of Beaver Island in northern Lake Michigan. We mapped the precise locations of these plants on a stretch of shoreline dunes using a GPS. In addition to our GPS-mapped points, we also collected abundance data for sites spread across the island. Using a nearest neighbor analysis, we determined that Centaurea, Cirsium, and Tanacetum all have clumped underlying spatial structures. Using methods described by Dixon (1994) and Coomes et al. (1999) we also performed two-species analyses measuring segregation and association between Centaurea and the native species, finding that there was highly statistically significant segregation between the species, but no significantly positive or negative association. Using a density-dependence size analysis, we determined that the size of reproductive Cirsium and Tanacetum was correlated with the number of neighbors they have in a 25 cm radius. Using our abundance data, we found no statistical indication that high abundances of Centaurea were correlated with low abundances of the two native species. We concluded that Centaurea, Cirsium, and Tanacetum are highly spatially segregated. As a result of this, if solely looking at the spatial structure of this plant community, it is impossible to determine whether proximity to Centaurea negatively impacts these two native species at this stage of the Centaurea invasion. In the future, we suggest performing experimental studies in which Centaurea is planted next to Cirsium and Tanacetum to examine its impact, in addition to continuing to track the Centaurea invasion on Beaver Island.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo, Mich. : Kalamazoo College.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Environmental Studies Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleThe Influence of Invasive Centaurea stoebe on Cirsium pitcheri and Tanacetum huronenseen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Environmental Studies Senior Integrated Projects [11]
    This collection includes Senior Integrated Projects (SIP's) completed in the Environmental Studies Concentration. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

Show simple item record