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dc.contributor.advisorGirdler, Erin Binney, 1969-
dc.contributor.advisorBlaauw, Brett
dc.contributor.authorMorden, Jacob M.
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-08T17:46:28Z
dc.date.available2013-07-08T17:46:28Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/28894
dc.descriptionv, 26 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent research has shown that one approach to conserving native bees in resource-limited habitats is providing them with areas containing native wildflowers that bloom throughout the season. Our study aimed to build upon this knowledge and test the importance of wildflower plot size for supporting bumble bees and the pollination services they provide to the wildflowers. To test this, we measured abundance, richness, and density of native bees at previously established wildflower plots ranging in sizes from 1-100 m2 at the Trevor Nichols Research Center in Fennville, Michigan. Our results concluded the positive attraction of native pollinators to the wildflower plots through an increase in native bee abundance, richness, and density in the wildflower plots. Mature seed counts for female reproduction success alluded to the importance of bees for pollination services over those provided by humans. The most abundant species of bumble bee found within the wildflower plots was identified as Bombus impatiens.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Entomology. Michigan State University. East Lansing, Michigan.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo Collegeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Biology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Biology;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleThe response of bumble bees and other native insect pollinators to wildflowers and habitat patch sizeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Biology Senior Individualized Projects [1405]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Biology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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