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dc.contributor.advisorFrost, Dennis J., 1976-
dc.contributor.authorPolicherla, Pavan
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-04T15:27:11Z
dc.date.available2013-05-04T15:27:11Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/28673
dc.descriptioniv, 33 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractAdoption has always posed issues in the development of a child's psyche, specifically identity and a sense of belonging. However, for cases where a child is adopted from a different country the same concerns appear in addition to new concerns about competence in the host culture as well as the culture of the country where the child is adopted from. In the past decade, adoption of children from China has been on the rise, but this is not the first time that transnational adoption has been popular in the United States. After the Korean and Vietnam Wars, adoption of Korean and Vietnamese children also experienced a marked increase among families in the United States. These adoptions are said to be done so that the children will be able to experience a better life than they would face were they to stay in their origin countries. The author analyzes the existing scholarship about the subject of transnational adoption. The two main works that are reviewed are a thesis written by Cindy Chang, and a study published by Kristy Thomas and Richard Tessler. This study aims to paint a picture of the current status of bicultural socialization in the realm of international adoption of Chinese children today.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College History Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleBicultural Socialization: A Literary Review of the Current Status on the Development of Ethnic Identity in Children Adopted from Chinaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • History Senior Individualized Projects [646]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the History Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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