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dc.contributor.advisorFrost, Dennis J., 1976-
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Guy
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-01T14:20:30Z
dc.date.available2013-05-01T14:20:30Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/28616
dc.descriptioniv, 86 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe rural-urban divide was created by a Maoist developmental platform that prized socialist modernization in both the rural and urban sectors. To achieve socialist modernization, the central government used concurrent political restructuring and internal migration restrictions to consolidate its hold on power and tailor the economy to fit CCP interests. Disparities between the rural and urban sectors in today’s market reform economy are connected to Maoist growth policies because those platforms began the process of prioritizing the city over the countryside. Only through analyzing the intersection of internal migration and economic legislation is it possible to understand the uneven growth and economic demarcations in the market reform economy. While local governments have proposed solutions to decrease structural inequities between the rural and urban sectors, it is the responsibility of the central government to address this issue in a comprehensive manner. Disparities in material resources and hukou-related welfare benefits challenge social stability and national economic growth, as the urban responses for migrant management will play a central role in China’s twenty-first century well-being.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College History Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. History.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleThe Creation of China’s Rural-Urban Divideen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • History Senior Individualized Projects [646]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the History Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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