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dc.contributor.advisorRice, Thomas, 1960-
dc.contributor.authorConrad, Eric
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-21T20:03:14Z
dc.date.available2012-12-21T20:03:14Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/28156
dc.description6 p., slidesen_US
dc.description.abstractA large part of my SIP stems from the development and progress that occurred primarily in the classes I had taken at "K" up through the fall quarter of my senior year. When I came to "K", I had already had a little experience working with water colors and ceramics, but had focused primarily on drawing. I immediately started taking studio classes beginning with basic drawing. Although I had no real direction or developed style at this point (nor do I now), I started to notice certain trends in the way I approached problems and the subject matter I chose to deal with, specifically, the human form. I then took my first painting class. Although some of these ideas were fresh in my mind, I spent most of my time in this class pushing around the paint, trying to become comfortable using color which at times was frustrating and somewhat overwhelming. Then while taking Figure drawing 1, I truly became re-interested in the figure. I heavily involved myself in the class and I found that in the process, I started having the experience of seeing, intuitively translating and drawing the figure without consciously analyzing it. This was very satisfying and seemed to happen more often, as the quarter progressed. I became increasingly interested in expressively capturing the essence of the figure as well as describing volume, mass and structure of the form. I continued to pursue this interest into my painting 2, as I became more comfortable using color and oil paint. It was only natural to continue figure painting for my SIP. It was just a matter of focusing in on what exactly I wanted to do and how to go about doing it. I was interested in creating emotional tension, conflict or disconnectedness, as well as well capturing the psychological/ emotional state of mind in a moment in time. A large part of this process involved looking at artists who were doing things that I was interested in or could relate my own work to. While in painting 2, I became a frequent patron of the library, checking out magazines and art books and racking up extremely large fines in the process.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Art Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Art.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleSix Figurative Paintingsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Art and Art History Senior Individualized Projects [374]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Art and Art History Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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