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dc.contributor.advisorCunningham, Kiran, 1961-
dc.contributor.authorHickman, Natalie M.
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-17T13:32:43Z
dc.date.available2012-08-17T13:32:43Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/27362
dc.descriptionviii, 57 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractLife in a small rural community can be difficult for all of its residents, but particularly rural youth. Much research in the last few decades has been devoted to the troubles of urban youth and the specific disadvantages they face, while the image of rural America has been portrayed as farm communities with close familial ties. However, the face of rural America is changing and the environment for adolescents is becoming more tumultuous than previously recognized. This analysis identifies the disadvantages unique to adolescents growing up in rural areas of the United States and explains how these affect the life paths of rural youth. Using UrieBronfenbrenner's ecological systems theory I will distinguish the specific disadvantages at the micro-, meso~, exo-, and macro-levels of development.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo, Mich. : Kalamazoo College.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Anthropology and Sociology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Anthropology and Sociology.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleRural Adolescent Disadvantage: An Ecological Systems Perspectiveen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Anthropology and Sociology Senior Individualized Projects [614]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Anthropology and Sociology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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