Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorCunningham, Kiran, 1961-
dc.contributor.authorBurns, Natalee
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T19:03:19Z
dc.date.available2012-08-16T19:03:19Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/27334
dc.descriptionvii, 103 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractPeople like to move around and internet economically and socially. Today, more than half of the world's population does this in cities. With growing concerns about traffic congestion, air pollution, energy consumption, roadway safety and parking availability, automobiles may not be sustainable as a mode of personal mobility in cities. In response, General Motors and Segway teamed to develop an innovative personal mobility system called PUMA (Personal Mobility and Accessibility). While PUMA offers compelling individual and societal benefits, consumers must aspire to own and use PUMA to realize these benefits. This paper applies consumer ethnography methods to assess PUMA's market potential on college campuses, where PUMA may initially be marketed. Ethnography involves understanding groups of people and documenting what is learned. Corporations began using this anthropology method in the 1980's to gain a deeper understanding of their customers. This was in line with an emerging shift in market power from producers to consumers. In contrast to quantitative consumer research methods, consumer ethnography helps companies uncover why consumers behave as they do. This leads to innovative products and market campaigns aimed at enhancing the overall consumer experience as a means to improve company success. Fifteen college students from large- and medium-sized cities were interviewed using pictures to gain insights about how they move around and interact on campus and how PUMA might change their experiences. Five 'personas' were created from the responses to reflect the diversity of college students and to better describe how PUMA might fit into the every-days lives of students. These results suggest that getting to class, time restraints, and interacting socially and conveniently are well integrated within the lives of college students. The students reacted positively towards the idea of PUMA and its ability to meet their mobility, time, and convenient social interaction needs and desires. PUMA holds promise as a way to enhance the freedom of people to move around and internet while eliminating the negative side effects of automobiles, especially in cities. For this potential to be realized, PUMA's safety must be demonstrated in a real world context. Ethnographic methods are important in uncovering what motivates mobility consumers and in identifying ways to develop and market innovative products.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Human Development and Social Relations Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Human Development and Social Relations.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleConsumer Ethnography: A Case Study Focused on Personal Mobility Technologyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Anthropology and Sociology Senior Individualized Projects [654]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Anthropology and Sociology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.
  • Human Development and Social Relations (HDSR) Senior Individualized Projects [73]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIPs) completed in the Human Development and Social Relations (HDSR) interdisciplinary major. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

Show simple item record