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dc.contributor.advisorBatsell, W. Robert, 1963-
dc.contributor.authorSolan, Elizabeth A.
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-26T12:16:57Z
dc.date.available2012-07-26T12:16:57Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/27038
dc.descriptionv, 41 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractSingle prolonged stress (SPS) is an animal model used to mimic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), where rats sequentially undergo three different stressors. SPS is known to cause changes similar to PTSD in the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Set shifting is a cognitive task requiring switching from one previously reinforced strategy to a new strategy, which involves the mPFC to successfully adjust to a set shift. An automated set shift was completed, with rats tested on lever in operant boxes. It was expected that since SPS diminishes mPFC function, rats that underwent SPS would be less successful than controls at set shifting. Rats with SPS performed similarly to controls on initial acquisition of the rules, indicating SPS did not cause any acquisition impairments. However, when it came to the set shift, SPS rats made significantly more never reinforced errors. The never reinforced errors arc those that do not follow the initial rule learned or the new rule of the set shift. This outcome suggests SPS rats learn the new strategy more slowly, by trying a different strategy that they have not learned before that is incorrect.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Psychology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Psychology.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleEffects of Single Prolonged Stress on Set Shifting Errorsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Psychology Senior Individualized Projects [722]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Psychology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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