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dc.contributor.advisorSacharin, Vera
dc.contributor.authorSon, Helen I.
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-25T12:47:21Z
dc.date.available2012-07-25T12:47:21Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/27025
dc.descriptionvii, 35 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractTerror management theory (TMT) states that mortality salience can threaten an individual's identity and cultural worldviews. Cultural worldviews help minimize uncertainty and create a sense of social identity in the world. Social categorization can be defined as an individual's identification with a group or it can be referred to as "stereotyping." In general, stereotyping is viewed as something negative, but in situations with mortality salience, individuals will self-verify themselves into a specific social group. In the past, studies have shown that mortality salience leads to favoring characteristics and the people in one's own social group. In the present study, it was hypothesized that individuals will self-stereotype themselves into social groups when threatened by the thought of death. 54 undergraduate females from University of Michigan participated in the experiment in exchange for credit. The surveys included either a mortality salient condition or a control condition. The results were not significant in which individuals in a mortality salient condition will self-stereotype themselves into a social group in order to find comfort.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Psychology. University of Michigan. Ann Arbor, Michigan.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Psychology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Psychology.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleMortality Salience and Self-Stereotypingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Psychology Senior Individualized Projects [707]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Psychology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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