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dc.contributor.advisorZajicek, Edward
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Brooke
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-17T17:34:35Z
dc.date.available2012-05-17T17:34:35Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/26192
dc.description52 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractSuccession Planning is emerging as a new technique used to enhance a business's position in the increasingly global and competitive market. Improved retention rates, refined management teams, and decreasing job-replacement costs are among the many benefits a succession plan can offer. However, creating and implementing a succession plan is costly and time consuming. During my summer internship at the Johnson Corporation, a small, international, manufacturing corporation, I designed a succession plan that would not have otherwise been possible because of the time and financial limitations. After researching succession planning I modified the suggested tools and techniques to better reflect and meet the needs of the Johnson Corporation. Because of Johnson's small size and my own time restrictions, the plan we created was simple and focused merely on identifying key-positions, key-characteristics, high-potential employees and future managerial replacement needs. Throughout the entire process the Human Resource Manager and myself constantly analyzed and revised our approach techniques until we were satisfied with the structure and procedures of the plan. My role in the succession plan was completed after conducting our first meeting with a department manager. The responsibilities of sustaining the plan now rest on the HR Manager and the rest of the High-Potential Task Team, which include the Chief Executive Officer, Vice-President of International Sales and the Vice-President of Marketing and Technology. Acquiring managerial support is vital to the continued success of a succession plan and the company as a whole.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipJohnson Corporation. Three Rivers, Michigan.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Economics and Business Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Economics and Business.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleSuccession Planning: Creating A Plan For The Johnson Corporationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Economics and Business Senior Individualized Projects [1145]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Economics and Business Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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