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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Kristen J., 1966-
dc.contributor.advisorVeenstra, Mark A.
dc.contributor.authorRuckman, Doug
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-19T19:37:23Z
dc.date.available2012-03-19T19:37:23Z
dc.date.issued1998
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/25514
dc.description31 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint. It enjoys the most freedom of movement of any joint in the human body. The humeral head (ball) fits into the socket of the glenoid cavity (socket). The cavity is less concave than most sockets in ball and socket joints, which allows for increased freedom of movement. This permits flexion, abduction, circumduction, and rotation. At the same time, the joint is anatomically less stable and must be stabilized in some manner. The rotator cuff is a series of tendons and tnuscles which stabilize the joint by keeping the humeral head firmly intact in the shoulder cavity. These tendons allow for flexibility and freedom of movement of the shoulder. The increased range of motion leaves the tendons susceptible to injury and is the source of many associated problems of the shoulder. Tendonitis is the most common shoulder problem that is associated with the rotator cuff. Tendonitis is simply an inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons and is most often caused by overuse at work or some activity where the rotator cuff is repeatedly stressed. It can also be caused by impingement, which is a pinching of the tendon between the head of the humerus and the overlying acromion. Tendonitis can be treated using anti-inflammatory medication and physical therapy. The most debilitating injury associated with the rotator cuff is the tearing of a rotator cuff tendon. This injury predominately occurs in patients over the age of 30, as tendons become less lax and are more susceptible to tearing. This injury primarily occurs during jerking or lifting motions or falling. Slow deterioration of the rotator cuff tendon resulting from prolonged tendonitis and impingement can also cause the tendon to easily tear. Open surgery to repair the tendon is the only treatment that results in recovery to previous functioning levels.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKalamazoo Valley Orthopedics. Kalamazoo, Michigan.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo, Mich. : Kalamazoo College.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Physical Education Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Physical Education.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleOpen Rotator Cuff Surgery: A Case Study in Orthopedic Medicineen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Physical Education Senior Individualized Projects [218]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Physical Education Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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