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dc.contributor.advisorBatsell, W. Robert, 1963-
dc.contributor.advisorBerridge, Kent
dc.contributor.authorCussen, Autumn M.
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-24T17:39:58Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T17:39:58Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/25202
dc.descriptionv, 33 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractNot all individuals who try a potentially addictive drug, or even a ‘hard drug’, become addicted. What causes the transition from ‘user’ to ‘addict’ in certain individuals has been long debated. The incentive salience hypothesis is one explanation to this question. According to this hypothesis, drugs cause many psychological changes in the brain. Of these changes, the most important is ‘sensitization’ or hypersensitivity to the incentive motivational effects of drugs and drug-associated stimuli. Incentive sensitization produces a bias of attentional processing towards drug-associated stimuli and a pathological motivation for drugs (compulsive ‘wanting’). Additionally, there are three psychological processes that compose incentive motivation and reward. Hedonic (pleasure) activation by a US (usually a reward, for addicts it’s the ‘drug high’), associative learning of the correlation between the cue CS and US, and attribution of incentive salience to the CS are all needed for incentive salience to occur. In this experiment, we used a non-specific dopamine antagonist, flupenthixol, to test the role of dopamine in reward and in incentive salience. If dopamine works in reward as the hypothesis predicts, then animals without dopamine would be able to produce hedonic responses and associative learning between the cue and reward but they would not be able to attribute incentive salience. Thus, once flupenthixol is removed animals should be able to perform all three aspects of the incentive salience hypothesis because none of the components are now blocked. Our results did not provide any significant results thus, future studies are needed to examine this hypothesis and its role in reward further.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Psychology. University of Michigan. Ann Arbor, Michigan.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo Collegeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Biology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Biology;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleIncentive salience: a motivational theory of addicitonen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Biology Senior Individualized Projects [1520]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Biology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.
  • Psychology Senior Individualized Projects [707]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Psychology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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