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dc.contributor.advisorSpencer, John B., 1919-1987
dc.contributor.authorGatlin, Dallas
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-25T19:52:31Z
dc.date.available2012-01-25T19:52:31Z
dc.date.issued1977
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/24687
dc.descriptioniv, 26 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractMan yearns for a sense of completeness, integrity, and well being; an awareness that he is fulfilling his human destiny. He sometimes experiences this "wholeness" in moments when life seems full of purpose, when he feels loved and accepted by significant others and so by himself. He seems to be in control of his own destiny. It would appear that within us is a standard or a voice calling us to perfection, i.e., to a state of wholeness. But this wholeness eludes us and this gives rise to anxiety, the terrible awareness that we are powerless to make or keep ourselves whole. I would like to propose, as have many others using various approaches, that the source of our being is also the source of our wholeness as humans; that the human predicament is that we have lost our wholeness and are powerless to restore it to ourselves; and finally that our source of being makes it possible for us once again to become fully human and whole. In this paper, I will make use of the works of two men, Paul Tillich, a theologian, and Paul Tournier, a psychiatrist, in order to develop a ground upon which we might better erect an understanding of the human predicament and its possible resolution.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Health Sciences Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Health Sciences;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleHuman Wholeness: Its Loss and Recoveryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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