Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSchott, Harold C., II
dc.contributor.advisorSotherland, Paul R., 1953-
dc.contributor.authorGroppi, Lauren
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-08T18:45:52Z
dc.date.available2011-12-08T18:45:52Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/24305
dc.descriptionv, 14 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractEndurance riding is a demanding sport in which horses compete over distances of so- 100 miles. Completion rates vary, depending on distance, with lameness the most common cause of failure (AERC 2003). Some studies suggest that changes in stride characteristics may be indicative of fatigue and lameness in horses, however limited research on this topic has been conducted. This study was performed to investigate the possible correlation between stride characteristics and lameness by measuring stride frequency and stride length at different stages of a treadmill endurance exercise test. We hypothesized that changes in stride frequency and stride length would be observed with increasing fatigue (toward the end of the exercise test). Six 2-year-old Arabian horses were videotaped while performing four 60-km endurance tests consisting of four IS-km bouts with both trotting (4 m/s) and cantering (8 m/s). Stride frequency and stride length were measured at both gaits near the beginning and end of each 15-km bout. No significant differences were found between the four tests for each horse; consequently, data were combined. Stride frequency ranged from 88.3-94.0 strides/min at the trot and from 117.5-123.5 strides/min at the canter; stride length ranged from 2.5-2.7 m at the trot and 3.9-4.1 m at the canter. There were no significant changes in stride frequency or stride length from the first to the fourth 15-km exercise bouts at either gait; however, within each IS-km bout stride frequency was greatest (p<0.01) and stride length was shortest (p<0.0 1) at the initial trot measurement. In conclusion, stride frequency and stride length were remarkably consistent over time in a 60-km exercise test. Consequently, further evaluation of these stride characteristics as an early indicator of lameness in competitive rides is warranted.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Large Animal Clinical Studies. College of Veterinary Medicine. Michigan State University. East Lansing, Michigan.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo Collegeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Biology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Biology;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleStride frequency and stride length in horses performing treadmill endurance exerciseen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Biology Senior Individualized Projects [1520]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Biology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

Show simple item record