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dc.contributor.advisorWright, Wayne M., 1934-
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, George K.
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-07T18:45:11Z
dc.date.available2011-09-07T18:45:11Z
dc.date.issued1977
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/23375
dc.descriptioniv, 39 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this project was to gain experience in analyzing and working with loudspeakers. The first step of this process was to learn how the electrical model for the loudspeaker is set up. This model predicts the electrical qualities that a loudspeaker will possess. The motion of the loudspeaker cone changes the speaker's electrical characteristics. This is intuitively obvious because the moving cone is storing and dissipating energy, which must change it's electrical qualities as presented to an amplifier or other device connected to the loud speaker. The second part of this project was to determine at various frequencies the component of the loudspeaker's impedance which is caused purely by the cone's motion. Analysis of this "motional impedance locus" yields the electrical and, through our analogy, mechanical characteristics of the speaker. Next a frequency response curve is recorded for the speaker mounted in an "infinite baffle". By deriving a complete electronic analogy of the loudspeaker, and substituting the previously calculated values into this circuit, the frequency response of the speaker can be predicted and compared with the measured response.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Physics Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Physics.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleElectrodynamic Transducer Analysis through Electronic Analogiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Physics Senior Individualized Projects [304]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Physics Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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