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dc.contributor.advisorSpotila, James R.
dc.contributor.authorEckert, Douglas H.
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-15T19:15:09Z
dc.date.available2011-08-15T19:15:09Z
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/23197
dc.descriptioniv, 40 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractAspects of the thermal biology, water loss rates and substrate preference of Emydoidea blandingi were investigated. Eggs from near the E.S. George Reserve in Livingston County, Michigan were hatched. Hatchlings were then acclimated to 25°C for 14 d. A hexagonal behavior arena was constructed for substrate choice experiments. Hatchlings showed a tendency towards substrates of clay-soil (32%) and water (25%). Thermal gradients were constructed for selected temperature experiments. The thermal preferendum ranged from 23°C to 34.1°C (x=27.44°C, SE=0.987) with the animals falling into three groups of similar selected temperatures. Water loss experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel. Water loss (x=46.62 mg/(g h)) showed little correlation to initial mass (r2=0.17, p=0.24) or vapor deficit (r2=0.000138, p=0.92). Critical thermal maximum, defined as the onset of muscular spasm, occured at 41. 7°C. These results have important implications for the analysis of habitat use.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipBiology Department. Drexel University. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo Collegeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Biology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Biology;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleThe Thermal Biology, Water Relations, And Selected Substrate Of The Blanding's Turtle (Emydoidea blandingi)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Biology Senior Individualized Projects [1489]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Biology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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