Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorPons, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorHadfield, Wendy
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-15T17:37:25Z
dc.date.available2011-08-15T17:37:25Z
dc.date.issued1990
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/23174
dc.descriptionv, 23 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe experimental question asked in this study was whether infant monkeys learn faster than adult monkeys. To address this question, we used two adult male cynomolgus and two infant rhesus monkeys. These monkeys were trained on delayed nonmatching-to-sample (DNMS) tasks in the visual modality with the adult's task being more difficult than the infants. All the monkeys were tested to a criterion of 90% correct responses in 100 trials. The oldest and largest adult male monkey never reached criterion. However, the three other monkeys did reach criterion. The other adult male monkey went on to do the task in the tactual modality and the two infant monkeys, after 14 days of rest, relearned their task in less than half the time it had taken originally. Our results demonstrate that infant monkeys learn at a significantly faster rate than had adults. This experiment was important because it showed that different age groups of monkeys should be studied as separate experiment groups and no comparisons should be made between them without first correcting for result differences caused only by age.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipLaboratory of Neurophysiology. National Institute of Mental Health. Bethesda, Maryland.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo Collegeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Biology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Biology;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleLearning in Adult and Infant Monkeys: A comparative Studyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Biology Senior Individualized Projects [1549]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Biology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

Show simple item record