Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLosey, George S.
dc.contributor.authorHarrington, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-10T19:05:16Z
dc.date.available2011-08-10T19:05:16Z
dc.date.issued1985
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/23172
dc.descriptionv, 40 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractField observations were made on interspecific aggression in the Hawaiian pomacentrid, Stegastes fasciolatus. Included are 17 species of intruders of which 3 are herbivores, 8 are carnivores, and 6 are omnivores. For purposes of the investigation, the resident's territory was divided into three horizontal and two vertical components. When an intruder entered a territory, the position of the intruder was recorded along with whether or not the intruder was chased. Totals were obtained for each species and converted to a three dimensional matrix. Various loglinear models were applied to the matrix to determine the relative significance of each term. It was determined that the species of intruder, along with its feeding habits, was the most important factor in eliciting an aggressive response from the resident.. The horizontal distance from the algal mat was found to be more important when the intruder was in close proximity to the substrate and not as important when distant. Finally, it was determined that different species violate a territory in different ways, but it is a reflection of the behavior shown by the resident towards them. The ecological justifications of such behaviors are discussed.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo Collegeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Biology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Biology;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleInterspecific Aggression in a Hawaiian Pomacentrid: Stegastes Fasciolatusen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Biology Senior Individualized Projects [1489]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Biology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

Show simple item record