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dc.contributor.advisorPollack, Diana
dc.contributor.authorMorehouse, Yasha A.
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-08T13:58:14Z
dc.date.available2011-08-08T13:58:14Z
dc.date.issued1996
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/23116
dc.descriptioniii, 42 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn an effort to produce ever more efficient oligonuleotide primers for genetic research, a comparison was made between various types of synthesizing machinery, synthesis methods and purification methods. A standard sequence (M13F0R24, see App. A) was run on each of the four synthesizing machines. The oligonucleotide primer product was then analyzed in four separate areas: 1) efficiency of synthesis: this information was provided by the machine itself and was based on the coupling efficiency at each step. 2) yield of the primer: an optical density reading was used to calculate both the concentration and yield of the product. 3) percent of full length product: chromatography separates the sample according to size and allows visualization of the amount of desired length primer. 4) performance in a sequencing application: the primer was used to sequence of piece of DNA to determine its efficiency in research applications. Based on the results obtained in each of these areas, it was concluded that Beckman 1000 synthesizing ,instruments are superior to Pharmacia-Biotech in synthesizing oligonucleotide primers.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipRayne Institute. Molecular Medicine Unit. King's Hospital. University of London. London, England.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo Collegeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Biology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Biology;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleTesting the Various Efficiencies of Oligonucleotide Synthesis for Use in the Gene Therapy Treatment of Canceren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
KCollege.Access.ContactIf you are not a current Kalamazoo College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this thesis.


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  • Biology Senior Individualized Projects [1520]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Biology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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