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dc.contributor.advisorWaring, Walter W., 1917-2007
dc.contributor.advisorHilberry, Conrad, 1928-
dc.contributor.authorBlaine, Sandra A.
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-20T15:45:13Z
dc.date.available2011-04-20T15:45:13Z
dc.date.issued1964
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/21194
dc.descriptioniii, 40 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe following essay is the result of a three-month study of the works of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Thomas Wolfe. Little use has been made of secondary materials in order that the study might be the thoughts of one student. I have concentrated on relating incidents and mentions of evil in the writings of each author in order to offer the reader evidence that each man did have a concept of evil and that this concept was important in his world-view. The conclusions I have drawn in the following pages are my reactions to this evidence, but these same conclusions are not a final statement on this subject or on the authors themselves.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College English Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. English.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleEvil in the Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Thomas Wolfeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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  • English Senior Individualized Projects [987]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the English Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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