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dc.contributor.advisorTownsend, Samuel F.
dc.contributor.authorSchreuder, Paul Henry
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-09T19:28:23Z
dc.date.available2010-06-09T19:28:23Z
dc.date.issued1969
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/15503
dc.descriptionv, 59 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper is intended to serve as an introduction to wound healing in connective tissues and its inhibition by glucocorticoid hypersecretion. To attempt a comprehensive review on the subject would have been futile; therefore cutaneous wound healing was chosen as a model. The simpler structural and functional relationships between the connective tissue and the epithelium of the skin, the dermis and epidermis respectively, in comparison to most other tissues, reduces many of the complexities involved in healing. Infection from either living microorganisms or inert particulate matter, although not uncommon after injury, further complicates the basic healing process and will not be included. The type of wound to be studied will be a narrow, cutaneous incision with the understanding that each wound is unique in itself, and depending on the damage inflicted need be repaired accordingly.en_US
dc.description.abstractIf you are not a current K College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this SIP.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKalamazoo Collegeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Biology Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Biology;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleConnective Tissue Wound Repair and Glucocorticoid Inhibitionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Biology Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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