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dc.contributor.advisorKay, William D.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Leah
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-27T23:40:29Z
dc.date.available2010-05-27T23:40:29Z
dc.date.issued1986
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/15379
dc.description84 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractHave you ever considered what might happen to you? Do you know what risks pervade your daily life? Are they risks taken voluntarily or involuntarily? Or perhaps you feel risk only affects some other poor unexpecting person and not you? There are many technical experts working presently on assessing what risks are acceptable to our society; but the bottom line obviously, is that no risk will be considered acceptable to those affected. In this paper I will be presenting current risk theories and ideologies expounded by: William W. Lowrance, Charles Perrow, Christoph Hohenemser, Roger E. Kasperson, Robert W. Kates, Paul Slovic, Baruch Fischoff, Sarah Lichtenstein, and William D. Rowe. Included in their ideas are definitions of risk and safety, structures for classifying and rating risks, descriptions on public perception of risks and corresponding validity of their judgments. Underlying my research on this subject from a lay person's point of view, was an event which occurred in December of 1984. On December 3, 1984, a lethal cloud of methyl isocyanate escaped from a pesticide production plant killing outright, approximately 2,000 people. World attention, as was mine, was focused on the event and its catastrophic consequences. My attention was sparked too because this event occurred in Bhopal, India, and I was intrigued by our American press releases which became very inward searching without telling us anything about India, its people, or its culture.en_US
dc.description.abstractIf you are not a current K College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this SIP.
dc.description.tableofcontentsIntroduction -- What is High Technology? -- The Responsibilities of Exports -- The Human Factor -- Causal Diagrams for Technological Systems -- Conclusion -- Bhopal -- UC and UCIL -- A Closer Look -- The Media -- Litigation Procedures: Only a Year -- Conclusion
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Political Science Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Political Science.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleWhat's Wrong America?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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  • Kalamazoo College Guilds: Justice and Peace SIPs [733]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) that deal with issues of justice and peace. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.
  • Political Science Senior Individualized Projects [770]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Political Science Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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