Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFlesche, Donald C.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Suzanne M.
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-14T00:03:32Z
dc.date.available2010-05-14T00:03:32Z
dc.date.issued1990
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/15042
dc.description48 p.en_US
dc.description.abstract"In their 1985 summit communique the heads of state of the seven largest industrial countries stated: 'Protection does not solve problems, it only creates problems.'"(Kreinin p.357) Why then is protectionism so prevalent? This simple question prompted my interest in examining the forces behind the proliferation of protectionism in the United States during the past decade. A consideration of the economic arguments for free trade quickly led to the discovery that this is one of a very few issues on which nearly unanimous agreement exists among scholars in economics. The gains from free trade are substantial whereas the costs of protection are high. Protectionism makes no sense from the perspective of national economic interest. Political motivations therefore seemed to be the key to comprehending this phenomenon. "Any important economic choice is by nature political, but the political dimension is often systematically obscured."(Krauss pp.71-72) Consequently I endeavored to unearth these root causes while working as a research assistant for Pietro S. Nivola, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C.en_US
dc.description.abstractIf you are not a current K College student, faculty, or staff member, email dspace@kzoo.edu to request access to this SIP.
dc.description.tableofcontentsIntroduction -- The Realist Approach -- Bureaucratic Warfare -- President and Congress -- Interest Groups: Japanese Masters of the Game -- Public Opinion -- The Specter of Smoot-Hawley -- Disguised Bids for Protection -- The Politically Expedient VER -- Tinkering with Trade Laws -- Conclusions and Predictions -- References
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Political Science Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Political Science.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleUnmasking the New Face of Protectionismen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Kalamazoo College Guilds: Justice and Peace SIPs [733]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) that deal with issues of justice and peace. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.
  • Political Science Senior Individualized Projects [770]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Political Science Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

Show simple item record