Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorStrauss, David, 1937-
dc.contributor.advisorPresler, Franklin A., 1943-
dc.contributor.authorGossman, Mary Beth
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-06T17:58:52Z
dc.date.available2010-04-06T17:58:52Z
dc.date.issued1983
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/14204
dc.descriptioniii, 149 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractWithin the social and cultural context of the Progressive era, I will discuss various reactions to prostitution, enumerating what groups and organizations were responding and how their responses reflected the different concerns and opinions they held. In chapter 1 I will look more closely at the general beliefs and fears which surrounded the changes taking place during the Progressive era and explain how prostitution came to be viewed as intrinsically bound up with these changes. In chapter 2 I will give an overview of the writers of this period, both reformers and theorists, who attempted to understand and explain prostitution to see how they are representative of the social thought of this era or how they represent a break from it. In chapter 3 I explore the popular, middle-American response to prostitution by focusing on the white slavery issue. In chapter 4 and 5 I return to the social purity movement to examine the response to prostitution which was given by the relatively small though powerful group of medical and scientific leaders. Finally, in chapter 6, I examine the great effort during the first World War to "keep the fighters fit" for combat, that is, free from venereal disease, and the impact this campaign had on prostitution.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsAcknowledgments -- Introduction -- The Progressive Era: Social Purity and Social Control -- The Social Evil Explained: The Response of Intellectuals and Reformers -- White Slavery and the "New Immigrants" -- Eugenics and the Menace of the Feebleminded -- Controlling the Prostitute: Eugenic Testing and Institutionalization -- Prostitution and the War Effect -- Epilogue
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Political Science Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Political Science.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder. All rights reserved.
dc.titleResponses to Prostitution in the American Progressive Era (1890-1920)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • History Senior Individualized Projects [646]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the History Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.
  • Kalamazoo College Guilds: Justice and Peace SIPs [733]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) that deal with issues of justice and peace. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.
  • Political Science Senior Individualized Projects [798]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Political Science Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

Show simple item record